Archive for the ‘sound art’ Category

Sound poetry and asemic writing come together for me whenever this question is posed, “How can an asemic poem be performed?” I think it only takes a simple leap of faith to be able to read an asemic poem like a music score, and to improvise with the score using asemic sounds. I will begin with two examples to demonstrate how both bubble up from the same well, though these images appear totally different at first glance. The first is the score for a sound poem that I based on a found asemic score, and the second is a black and white typographical visual poem that evolved from a list of smoothie ingredients. In 2009, I took a photo of parallel linear shadows on a wall and messed with the digital file using image software. When I was playing around with the digital file, a combination of Photoshop Elements commands amplified wider and narrower sections in the linear shadows and a saturation of the colors brought out blue areas in the lines. I recognized a sound poem in the results; Wider darker sections equaled louder sound and narrower sections equaled quieter, softer sounds, and blue in the lines call for the ringing of wind chimes or bells. Two vertical shadow lines were scored for quick event performances where they intersected with parallel lines. The image is divided into 10 1/2 measures: each line is performed simultaneously by one voice for each line, two extras to perform the ‘incidents’, and one person to count steadily to 11 to help the performers keep time with the score. Here is the resulting score:Composition for 9 Voices with 2 Incidental Sections

Scanning printed text while moving the paper during the scan produces asemic text when the original text can’t be read for its original intended meaning. Also using computer software, I did some layering and fine tuning until I felt satisfied with this asemic poem:milk-seeds-March-16-2017-cmb

The element of chance is very important in both of the above projects. The first project involves natural light and photo technology. A performance of the score involves multiple people making asemic sounds of their own choosing. The second is a form of copy art that involves chance elements of movement and time. There is also a common element of glitch art with the use of computer technology. The results stimulate thinking the same way that reading music scores or text do, but with the use of a broad artistic palette with an inter-media approach: music, literature, poetry, performance art, the plastic arts (including photography and calligraphy), conceptual art, etc.

Asemic writing is a form of visual poetry in that it is a confluence of writing/reading and it often involves the above mentioned inter-media approaches. There is self-consciously produced asemic writing and there is the serendipity of ‘found’ asemic writing that can be documented in human environments. Human documentation of that which is perceived as asemic writing happens in both urban and in natural environments, such as ant trails on a log, swirling water, the spreading angles of ice on a window, etc. Composition for Nine Voices (the first example in this essay) was ‘found’ in light and shadows on a bathroom wall. The second black and white example involved text that was a recognized language which was then deconstructed in such a way as to make it unreadable as a traditional text.

The artist, writer, or performer might wrinkle a text on paper into a ball and then attempt to read it, or tear it into pieces and reassemble it by chance. Both those techniques have been used to create a kind of “dada” poetry, but true asemic meaning would result not only in scrambled phrases or sentences, but in unrecognizable words. I think the definition of “asemic” must remain fluid, however. Here is a statement about that term written by my spouse, who is also a poet/artist: “Everything is asemic to some degree in that everything is not fully understandable, except perhaps in the multiple, mostly unconscious, regions of the mind. Thus, nothing is truly asemic; everything has meaning,” John M. Bennett, March 2017. John was practicing a form of asemic handwriting in the late 1970’s, which he called “spirit writing”. An example of JMB 1977 spirit writing on graph paper, rubber stamped at the top with “MEAT RECEIVING”, appears in one of Tim Gaze’s first issues of asemic magazine (which Gaze started in 1998). You can see the ambiguity of John’s statement in that “everything is asemic” and “everything has meaning”. There is a kind of “zen attitude” in contradictions, and to be fluid in your thoughts is to be living in the fluxus moment.

German fluxus artist, Brandstifter, in collaboration with artist, Ann Eaty, asked us to collaborate with them on a project. We recorded our separately improvised vocalization of syllables and sounds found in the scattered letters of alphabet soup pasta. They included the audio in their March 2017 NYC gallery antipodes presentation, paired with two scanned images of the scattered pasta which appears to come out of a each of their scanned heads . A year or two previous to Brandstifter’s project, John and I had recorded video of a similarly improvised asemic performance. Improvising, we vocalized asemic and sometimes recognizable words from each other’s scrambling of letters, resulting in a the video “Gaez and Vexr”, found at my YouTube site: https://youtu.be/rql_IQvpf5Q

Music can inspire a kind of lyrical singing of nonsense syllables like what is called “scat” in jazz singing. This kind of improvisational thinking is a high art form of asemic language, and is one of the inspirations for asemic verbalizing I’ve done in performance venues. That, along with a performance I saw by Lori Anderson decades ago, and YouTube videos or SoundCloud audios of people performing Ursonate, a sound poem by Kurt Schwitters. Jaap Blonk, Christian Bök, and Olchar Lindsann are artists who have successfully undertaken a performance of Ursonate. Schwitters was one of the early dadaists, though he termed his activities as “MERZ”. Hugo Ball also wrote and performed sound poetry and, along with his partner Emmy Hennings, started Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, Switzerland in 1916 – the very first Dada performance venue. Hugo Ball’s sound poem, KARAWANE, is iconic! The poem image below shows a playful visual presentation where the author uses multiple fonts, some italicized and some bolded, and the straight forward phonetically spelled words are ripe for performance. Ubuweb site has audio files of six of Hugo Ball’s sound poem being performed: http://www.ubu.com/sound/ball.htmlkurt schwitters_karawane

“Zaum” was coined by Russian futurist Velimar Khlebnikov (b.1885 d.1922) and poet/theorist Alexei Kruchonykh for a kind of suprarational, transcendental, phonetic, poetic language of the future. Paul Schmidt, an English translator of that Russian genre coined the term “beyonsense” in relation to Zaum because of the emotions and abstract meanings he felt were more forcefully conveyed without the intervention of common sense. Igor Satanovsky (b.1969, Kiev, Ukraine) is a bilingual Russian-American poet/translator/visual artist who moved to the United States in 1989 (per press release by Koja Press, 2006). On a Facebook page created by Satanovsky to commemorate “Zaum Day” [January 7th, 2017], he posted two interesting Zaum poems. “Sec” by Daniel Harms (Daniil Kharms), a Russian poet who was publishing in the 1920’s, and “KIKAKOKU!” by Paul Scheerbart, a German poet who published this early phonetic poem in 1897 in his book called: I love you! A railroad novel with 66 interludes. New Edition: Pub: Affholderbach & straw man, 1988, p. 278. Here is an excellent recorded performance of KIKAKOKU! on You Tube by the Uruguayan poet, musician, and performance artist, Juan Angel Italiano in collaboration with Luis Bravo, poet/teacher extraordinaire. https://youtu.be/QgMGYXyRVTw
Italiano has made videos and audio recordings of lots of sound poetry performances by Luis Bravo, John and myself, and others.

Many Pentacostal and other charismatic churchs strive to inspire their members to “speak in tongues” when they are baptized, a form of asemic language known as “glossolalia” or “Ecstatic language”, which is also embraced by charismatic movements in Protestant and Catholic churches. There is ancient evidence of this phenomenon in early pagan temples and Ancient Byblos (1100BC). Here is a quote from Dr. John R. Rice’s book, The Charismatic Movement, pp. 136-139: “Some Christians talk in tongues. So do some Mormons, some devil-possessed spiritists, (and) heathen witch doctors in Africa and Asia. Ages ago many heathen religions talked in tongues. It is not of itself necessarily of God.” There are preachers who claim to interpret glossolalia as if it were the word of God; however, I think asemic writers see glossolalia as a mimicking of language, a symbolic façade, and a tool to “free up” the areas of the human brain that process language.

The asemic approach to invented language and/or calligraphic gestural abstraction is an unrestrictive and is very open process. We must not forget that as humans we start out linguistically by voicing baby talk, which is a beautiful naive form of asemic language. A young child’s art has an innocence and free spirit that is often lost later on in middle school, when a tightness forms around attempts at artful representation of images. Preconceptions about the object being drawn and about what encompasses good art or poetry can get in the way of actually ‘seeing’ what is there and rendering it. The same thing can be said about the academic approach to language and literature, and more currently, the effect of ‘workshop poetry’ on writer’s sensibilities. On a more populous level, many people in the USA have come to accept clichés and greeting card verse as good poetry. I believe our exposure to good contemporary poetry at a young age in school is limited. Compared to the USA, many other countries have a greater appreciation of poetry and value their contemporary poets.

We, as artists, must be open to the creation end of literature and poetry and search for meaning without the hindrance of preconceptions. Meaning is found in the act of creation, interaction with nature and the media chosen to convey our thoughts, and in intuitive thought processing. Often the art is in the doing as much as in the artifact that remains. The asemic approach encourages new ways of reading and thinking and reaches across language barriers. Being open to interpretation and change is in the reading as well as in the writing. Any meaning the reader construes is a correct translation. Asemic meaning or non-meaning is not a static thing, but a meaning in flux.

There are public places in urban settings where event notices or advertisements are posted and then torn down with bits that remain in layers upon layers, often resulting in a colorful patina of collaged text. This is “found” asemic writing, but the collage technique is also a very deliberate human initiated process in asemic writing and art. The collage technique began with artists like Hannah Höch and others in the Dada movement that took hold around the end of WWI in Europe. The absurdity of the chaotic realities of damaged human lives that came about as a result of the war was greater than any absurdity an artist or writer could imagine. The new media of photography brought reality and current events into the tool box of artists. The act of creating a composition with typography and photographic images was a way of trying to create order out of chaos. Urban graffiti is a similar response to absurdities of real life. Amid those urban ‘found collages’ of pasted leaflets, we also find spray painted graffiti. Graffiti ‘tags’ and stylized calligraphy may appear as asemic to the average onlooker, though it usually has a specific meaning to the artist/author and maybe their immediate circle of peers.

The creation of glyphs and symbols, new words and poetic sounds, often might start out in a vacuum and will then begin to gain meaning within a cultural milieu. Or it might only be known to one living person who dies with that knowledge, perhaps leaving behind an artifact of that language. That artifact will be perceived as asemic by the rest of humanity, though anthropologists may attempt to decipher the meaning, for example that of ancient Mayan glyphs. It is a very human and natural instinct in all of us to be attracted to glyphs, symbols, new words, interesting typography, and sounds because of a basic need to read or interpret signs in the world around us, and to use these as tools to communicate with others.

Citing the NY Ctr for Book Arts website http://centerforbookarts.org/making-sense-of-asemic-writing/, wikipedia states that “The history of today’s asemic movement stems from two Chinese calligraphers: “Crazy” Zhang Xu, a Tang Dynasty (circa 800 CE) calligrapher who was famous for creating wild illegible calligraphy, and the younger “drunk” monk Huaisu who also excelled at illegible cursive calligraphy”.

A Japanese calligrapher, Shiryu Morita (b.1912) sought “a common universal language that was centered on spontaneous gestural abstraction.” In his work he wanted to “reconceptualize calligraphy as a contemporary artistic medium while seeking to rise above the barriers between cultures so as to generate a new international art.” Source: http://www3.carleton.ca/resoundingspirit/morita.html

In America in the 1950’s with the rise of modern abstract expressionism and its male icons, we had something akin to asemic writing in the paintings of Jackson Pollock (though he never acknowledged any connection with writing in his work), Cy Twombly Jr., and Brion Gysin (who, aside from his asemic paintings, literally inspired William Burroughs with his experimentation with the cut-up technique). Today, asemic calligraphic writing appears in art museums globally, including beautiful examples from Islamic artists.

In this digital, post-modern age [computers and fast paced work environments and expanding online social networking], asemic writing is more accepted, recognized, and appreciated on a global scale. It can be created via interdisciplinary genres of writing and other art forms such as the visual arts; including digital art and contemporary forms of drawing, typography, and photography, video, sound, and performance arts. “Intermedia” is a term used for these interdisciplinary arts practices that have developed between separate genres, and was an important concept promoted by Fluxus artist, Dick Higgins. In the past few decades many art departments in universities have begun to offer degrees in intermedia.

In November 2008, visual poetry finally received some attention from Poetry Magazine, which was founded by Harriet Monroe in Chicago, 1912, and today is one of the leading monthly poetry journals in the English-speaking world. This attention came in the form of an article by Geof Huth which offers comments on a portfolio of twelve works by thirteen visual poets. With his selections, free wheeling asemic poetry is given as much credence as more tradition concrete visual poetry. It is to Huth’s credit that he puts forth both visual poetry as a whole, but also the asemic markings in the portfolio, as poetry. Take a look: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/articles/detail/69141
Asemic poetry is harder for the academics to accept than visual poetry with recognizable words, and there is a faction of visual poets who see it as part of the plastic arts rather than a form of visual poetry. Yet, no matter how asemic writing is categorized, there can be no denying that it has garnered attention in the past couple decades. Many examples are published in the 2010 anthology edited by Nico Vassilakis and Crag Hill called “The Last Vispo”… website here: http://www.thelastvispo.com/

One of the first people to curate an exhibit of asemic poetry was Tim Gaze, an Australian poet who has written about asemic poetry and was one of the first of our contemporary circle to be interviewed about asemic writing. Jim Leftwich (Roanoke, VA) was working around the same time as Gaze in asemics,and Michael Jacobson of Minneapolis MN discovered Tim Gaze’s asemic magazine in 2005, and drew parallels with the novella he was working on “The Giant’s Fence.” http://www.commonlinejournal.com/2008/12/interview-tim-gaze.html is a link to an interview with Tim Gaze who hosts a website at http://www.asemic.net ; also see http://www.asymptotejournal.com/visual/michael-jacobson-on-asemic-writing/ for an interview with Michael Jacobson, who administers a blog and a Facebook page by the same name called “The New Post-Literate”. Luna Bisonte Prods publishes works by experimental writers and poets, and recently published three volumes by Jim Leftwich titled “rascible & kempt: meditations and explorations in and around the poem”. Find descriptions and previews of all three “rascible & kempt” volumes at http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/lunabisonteprods These volumes have examples of Jim’s asemic poetry as well as interesting discussions about the current milieu of experimental writers and their work. Current terminology he uses for what he sees as today’s experimental writing: “quasi-calligraphic drawing”, “writing-against-itself”, and “polysemic writing”.

The final image I present here is an example of a straight forward back & forth asemic writing I did through snail mail during mailart exchanges with Forrest Richey, aka Ficus strangulensis. The calligraphic practice sheet was set up by me and mailed to ficus, and also other mailart contacts. The first line on this card was his and we alternated until the card was full.  asemic writing 003

The entries made from a continuous line are a form of automatic writing, or ‘spirit’ writing. The surrealists, inspired by Freud and the unconscious mind, were doing something similar called surrealist automotism. When I was an MCAD art school student in the early 1970’s, I filled an entire sketchbook with the sort of doodling you see on the last line. I’ve also seen that kind of continuous line patterning piped onto the surface of our wedding cake by an Amish baker and cake decorator, so I know it’s nothing new. But I enjoyed a meditative state of mind as I was doing it. I never titled the drawings, instead I just documented my start and stop times. Another artist, Billy Bob Beamer from Roanoke VA, has a similar kind of ‘in the zone’ automotism approach with what he calls his ‘word dust’ pencil drawings. See this weblink for more on BBB: http://www.outsiderart.info/beamer.htm

 

C. Mehrl Bennett, Columbus OH, USA
Artist, poet, mailartist, writer, audio experimenter, associate editor of Luna Bisonte Prods
March 2017

Deport Dada!

I’ll DING 21 of 35 in 20 dance terms as a parting  token.. that artificial hell issued Washinton D.C.  culture and the ache  surprise, f-fabric landscapes, erotic symbols, Ill eats start to scatter. breaking  adverse  Prosperity, creativity, and BARACK! BARACK!  support The arts!  fundamental  to  beauty, ethnicity, religion, or age performance… For Breton it was out of cabaret and the words are of those eaten OMMMMMMMMMS.  Your  tax NOTICE, Dear  Ms.  NOTHING, and eat  canned beans, that Dada should employ Benefits!  You can request message  I delivered: Breton had fallen on our prom  conTaining obscene drawings: A few months ago  it took  place out  of  cabaret in notice of the adverse beatification, Please state whether you request documents or information: when the reason you believe a nearby cafe to be  Threatening and subversive, dada has conventions to create a new type  of action and review your animation of  our Air, making  moments into a peanut seller, partly because  The  hat and or proxy, he  us  to  her in I t or ork my Education laden Dada group, decanting  the event into a rut through Improved academic  standardized test scores, audience relations, improperly denied comments, … OUT pu-U-zation has an OUT  of  tourism … artist’s actions  would be  imagined better than in a theatre… OW!  ILL you is at we  OK  the  at  of off, here  to end each In a manner  you  can  understand  through This, We,  A hand of tens

C. Mehrl Bennett 9/13/14, revised 1/13/2016

Nothing Wavering

In a house of silences that engage

Two pyromaniac gymnasts,

It might be hard to believe the

Secrets of this man’s work, or the life he lives

In the company of his wife.

Everything projects a

Banal shadow of absence–

Because of the presence of a way of being–

The spectrum of this man and

His wife in a litany of Both.

Wavering lines in the sun – layered by shadows

Are at first possible, but then reproach us as impossible

Do you recognize the girl that first met this man?

She came from especially nowhere, but grew up in

A Since Possessed Dialogue.

An actor claimed to bury

This couple by adopting a lost and found attitude,

For hadn’t we lost the entire collective generation decades earlier?

Mysteriously, whether we believe the story or not

All this says is that 1953 underpins a reality.

In this power play there exists

A fifties world in which was born

The first woman, C. Mehrl Bennett

Who wrote the following poem:

GOING TO MANONG

The WHOLE of St. Louis is, like,

At a LOSS,

Like a LOSER,

Chain smoking

We’ll have

NO CHILI

NO CHOCOLATE

NO NADA tonight!

C. Mehrl Bennett

Note: I performed the original composition from August 2013 at 100,000 Poets for Change” event at Tribes gallery in NYC on October 28, 2013 in NYC;  the “Going to Manong” [poem within the poem] was drastically shortened for this revised version from January 2016… the original unedited version was posted previously in this blog. I edited it for submission to a publication coming out this year.


**Performance for two with audience participation. 
One person, the barker, is responsible for shouting out the BOLD TYPE phrases, 
and the audience repeats whatever the barker shouts out. 
The other person performs the rest of the text and joins with the barker in 
shouting the final series of BOLD TYPE, which the audience will echo, 
and hopefully after both people stomp there feet at the end, 
the audience will also imitate that action! [..which is exactly what happened 
at the performance in August 2016 during Day 3 of MINNEDADA84 at MCBA auditorium]
**DADA LEGS MIRTH
WHY HISTORY? ART HERE

NOW WINDOW LOST

WHY DO COLLAGE? OIL SKY

SALE HOLE LEFT

WHY A EYE? REAL HISTORY

DO DATE LEG

NOW WHY ICE? SKY LOST

EYE STOP WINDOW

WHY A EAR? ART NOW

HEARS LOST FARTS

STOP THE SEA? FOUND LEG

COLLAGE LOST TODAY

YIN A YEAR? REAL YANG

SALE OF EYE

WHY WORDS NOW? FOUR LEGS

FLOAT IN SEA ICE

WHY OIL MIRTH? REAL SKY

FOR SKY YET

DO LEGS MIRTH? SEA LEFT

COLLAGE WAVES A STORY

WHY HISTORY? ART HERE
ART NOW
SEA LEFT
REAL YANG
REAL HISTORY
REAL SKY
OIL SKY
SKY LOST
FOUND LEG
FOUR LEGS
[stomp feet]

C. Mehrl Bennett

Jan. 13, 2016, revised 8/19/2016

SHOPPING LIST

Do Not Buy Fruit

rubber stamps

or a gun

Do Not Buy Olives

dentures

or a photograph

Do Not Buy Fish

shoes

or a hat

Do Not Buy Bread

books

or a cat

Do Not Buy Envelopes

bushes

or a suitcase

Do Not Buy A House

stamps

or a bus ticket

Buy Art Instead.

C.Mehrl Bennett

Jan. 3, 2013 (Revised Jan. 13, 2016)

n i e z h f p l t s u

(the following poem uses only these eleven letters)

zip in zen she felt

i feel hip

zine lists fine snips

slit pine tile peel

senile penis hit flies

isle sent file

lets help teens fit the line

he is feet fuzz

pile hen pelt lept

his hell left this

puzzle lit flute pen

hi ’tis shit nuts

tin huts fizz sez she

C. Mehrl Bennett  – March 2, 2015

 

 

Two Montevideo Cinquains

MUSIC

Piano sounds

Chicken crossing the road

The documentation is a

Seed trail

Cone shaped

Trees on a line

“From ear to ear” means that

Possibly you will sleep before

Xmas

C. Mehrl Bennett – Nov. 11, 2013

 THE BELL

 

The bell

Gland drizzling out

On a greasy bongo

Floating far out on the drunk bay

Window

 

John M. Bennett and C. Mehrl Bennett

Feb.23, 2013

 

 

  

Six Collaborative Cinquains

Corn tome

Inside the boat

Kayaking in circles

Shoulder banging against the wind

Popcorn

Reboot

The hammered foot

A dulcimer shoe bag

Toeing the line lining the toes

Hot sock

Off shirt

Loose in empty

And butt barely hairy

Shaving backwards toward the drain

target

Saunter

Solder soldier

Sweating in the bathroom

After finding grapes and gravel

Gritty

Darvon

So dart it off

The loopy poolside

Super fooling slowly folding

Your neck

Just lick

Your salty lips

Salt licks where blind hunters

Smoulder in the tent with hamsters

Sleeping

Edward Lense, John M. Bennett, C. Mehrl Bennett – Sept. 21, 2013 – These cinquains were published as a TLP [tacky little pamphlet] by LBP [Luna Bisonte Prods]

Six (more) Collaborative Cinquains

Trailing

Sipping quincunx

Floating head mice ladder

Walk the talking titmouse to the

Iced hat

Dead saints

In the buckets

Well placed in a circle

Multi-red-spin fulminating

Cheese root

Swoll drut

Tear the finger

Drum the forkѐd link bit

Bit the hot lint sausage hymn

Doldrums

Pink ink

The throne swallowed

All the people at once

Crinkling post-haste wanton twice the

Suit Shot

Same wurst

Dance the knocking

Turnip nipped the frog spawn

Locker dripping through the keyhole

Drip Drip

East West

Reft lightning trips

The looter sign shining

Muskrat tunnels under the bank

Of weft

Camille Martin, John M. Bennett, C. Mehrl Bennett – November 2012 – These cinquains were published as a TLP by LBP


RINGER

Ringer

Tones developed

Inside the red phone booth

Of superman with snail toes

Burping

Ample

Coffee toffee

Lays on the car hood as

She breaks all the LP’s from the

Trailer

I sit

On a tree stump

In the beauty parlor

As balls of lint float in the pink

Hair dye

Paisley

Bow tie on foot

Where’s yer before shrieker?

Inside a box under the dock’s

Big toe

Who’s yer

Worldly wisened

Anguished pal; Is he a

Hip duck diode with no dick to

Paddle?

Paddle

On the other

Side of this sandbox full

Of silver cats as a dead dog

Lingers

C. Mehrl Bennett 2015

* RINGER was first published in THE INAPPROPRIATED PRESS, Issue# 1, editor: Olchar Lindsann, Monocle Lash anti-Press, Nov. 2015, Roanoke, VA

COMPOSITION FOR NINE VOICES WITH TWO INCIDENTAL SECTIONS

is a score for Sound Poetry integrating image, vowel sounds, wind chimes, and two “incidents”.

Click HERE to watch a video on YouTube of a performance of this score. The link is to a video by Paul Baker of a 2010 performance by Be Blank Consort (BBC) members. These were volunteers from writers/performers gathered together for The Ohio State University Library’s [Special Collecions Dept.] Intnl. Avant Writing Symposium, and most of them had performed previously in other venues in the USA as BBC members.

At my direction and with copies of the score, nine of them performed using vowel sounds and windchimes, while another person counted to twelve, and two others performed “incidents”.  I was able to enlist Keith Buchholz and Reed Altemus to perform short Fluxus events for the incidents. The score is based on linear shadows in my photo of a public bathroom wall, digitally manipulated with ten and a half measures indicated.

C. Mehrl Bennett 2009

This poem is titled “6500 Machine Diagram” & comes screaming behind me

In front of me is a diagram fished out of a box now back in sentence form which rolls against a hat of snow

Yellow, magenta, and cyan cartridges are attached but are dysfunctional right now

The transfer roll is spooled with paper from the Pope

Something called a fuser is part of the action with a black and white headshot of a transfer role – on a stamp

It is 4:30a.m. and fresh snow is going to close the door to the hallway

The heater is about two feet from my two feet

The air is beginning to warm up around my fingers through my own hoard of books and is worth reading before my husband

I should copy this diagram over various add & pass into another attitude

Print out this page and cut it into four, yellow, magenta, something that bends into envelopes with collaborations

After a xerox is processed the paper heads out

Does the Xerox company still make copy machines?

Mail crosses my desk and stuff

I wonder if that address still exists?

Meanwhile, my fingers are still getting cold, covering for the dull grayness of mid-February outside my window

I will need go through a bag of books to type these sentences out of the house

I will also need to winnow out the lemons – on a stamp

So of course I get distracted by Facebook!

I also need to organize my studio space upstairs into a xerographic drum which rolls against a hat of snow, and has been that way for months on end, but a tray will catch hold

The post office recently issued first class stamps that follow into attaching to paper by a young Elvis Presley, with his signature reproduced, but onto mail from the mid-1980’s

I had a dentist appointment this morning, though to a receiving tray

I had a full set of xrays taken six months ago while he stuck a camera in there

This new young dentist had me hold my mouth open and took digital photos

The images appeared on a screen in Xerox Square, Rochester, New York

My mouth is tired

My Dad is dead

So why don’t quarters rearranged themselves?

Whatever happens can playfully manipulate the wind and wear a hat of snow

A hat of snow           A hat of snow

A hat of snow           A hat of snow

C. Mehrl Bennett February 2016

  • Stefan Brand Stifter will be using my audio recording of “6500 Machine Diagram” (and my image that goes with it) as part of his ANTIPODES ZINE SAMPLER with a sound CD… CLICK HERE to see diagram & hear audio

P O P  SONG (performed in Columbus OH in 2015 and 2016)

admit one                       light a match

backup admit                 enter backwards

admission rate               welcome canned words

discounted rate             a radio announcer

preview films                  feet in cement shoes

advance to present      [insert today’s date and time]

presentation mode       write a song / sing it:

 

PRETTY PENCILS [1981]

 

Pretty pencils, sticking in my hair

Pretty pencils, sticking right at me

I’ve got pretty pencils… sticking 

Out my nose

fast mode to the  future                      question  effectiveness !

rafting off the roof                               answer all charges

please take your seat mam!

I  will now perform the event, titled: “NoBody’s Surprise”:

                                                                    Blow up a balloon until it POPS

 

5x7 Bathroom Song with all verses.jpg

5x7 well she had and pretty pencils.jpgCLICK HERE to hear an audio of me singing these three nonsense songs.

(Copyright: C. Mehrl Bennett)

*NOTE: Earlier versions of some of these poems  were published on this blog before.

MetaDada No. 1, THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DADA MINING,  editor H. Michael Sanders, was published on May 15, 2016 by Elena Press, Cincinnati Ohio. May 15th, 2016, was the 100th anniversary of the publication of the first Dada journal, Cabaret Voltaire, editor Hugo Ball, Zurich, Switzerland, May 15, 1916. Two of the above poems (Shopping List and niezhfpltsu) appeared in MetaDada No. 1, in addition to two of my visual poems: Croatian Glyphs DADA and Forbidden Planet.

NOW GO TO THE METADADA WORDPRESS SITE by clicking HERE – C. Mehrl Bennett

           

ADDENDUM: See below for two more songs that I added to those above when I performed during Day Two of the MinneDaDa84 Fest in Minneapolis MN in August 2016. I had the privilege of being accompanied by Cassia Harding, a very accomplished violinist!Cassia-Harder-and-CMB-at-Black-Forest-Inn-Day-2-MinneDada84.jpg

If You Try and You Mess Up with ukele chord tabs 4x6 N o t   Y e t 4x6

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The ANTI-BRAIN ROT mailart exhibit was hosted during Roanoke VA’s 2015 AFTER MAF (After Marginal Arts Festival – an AFTER effect from the now defunct annual Marginal Arts Festival)

These are BUT A FEW of the many submissions recieved from all over the world.
Wilhelm Katastrof (alias Tomislav Butkovic) will be mailing documentation out.
Tomislav is pictured behind the glass in this photo of postcards on french door window panes.
Mailart was also hung from clips on strings in one room, and spread out on tables in both rooms.
W Katastrof at home
During the opening last weekend, Reid Wood performed the “Xeno’s Donut” score, Tomislav played an audio CD collaged from various contributors (edited & mailed by Mark Sonnenfeld), and the cat went in and out.

MORE PHOTOS from AFTER MAF performances & events, plus detailed descriptions (including descriptions for the mailart in this slideshow) can be found in my Flickr album by clicking HERE but ALSO see ALOT of video documentation of performances that took place at ART RAT STUDIO by clicking HERE !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

https://soundcloud.com/catherine-mehrl-bennett/volodymyr-bilyk-piano-score-played-as-a-rondo-by-c-mehrl-bennett

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Original Score by Volodymyr Bilyk

volodymyr bilyk rescored by cmb 001

Volodymyr Bilyk rescored by C Mehrl Bennett

https://soundcloud.com/catherine-mehrl-bennett/volodymyr-bilyk-rescored-by-c-mehrl-bennett

Click on THIS LINK to go to Hal McGee’s website and read more about his production of A HAMSTER IN YOUR SANDWICH, a CD (originally produced as a limited edition tape cassette) of John M. Bennett and I performing our own, each other’s, and our collaborative poetry, and making off noises with our voices and other instruments.

PLUS from that website you can listen to the entire PART I of the recording! Also, HERE is a link to DICK METCALF’s comprehensive review, written in June 2015. Dick is a professional in the area of experimental audio, so look further into his website for great reviews of other recordings!

I’d like to make a few comments here primarily about the second section of the recording: One of the joint readings was a spontaneous performance, in that I gave John my book WHAT IT SAYS and he gave me his book MIRRORS MÁSCARAS, then we took turns at spewing short phrases of whatever caught our attention as we flipped through the books. I had done that sort of thing once before during Roanoke VA’s Marginal Arts Festival at the home of Olchar Lindsann, where, at his suggestion, the group was encouraged to grab a book from his library and alternate with phrases chosen at random. What John and I did by trading texts was different in that one would hear one’s own poetry coming back at one and find text from the other’s poems that seemed to complement or twist it in new ways. That was truely a FIRST of it’s kind in our collaborative poetry efforts! The CD title, A HAMSTER IN YOUR SANDWICH, was taken from a section of the very last poem by John read towards the end of the recording: an English/Spanish poem on p. 237 of MIRRORS MÁSCARAS titled “mirlibroror”. I copied John’s audio of “.a hamster in ,your sand/ wich” and mixed it into a final take with other sound tracks for the recording’s end. My poem, DEPORT DADA, was created in cutup fashion the morning of the day of recording as I wanted to perform something new, but I’ve created a shorter ‘fluxus’ version since I recorded it for Hal McGee’s project. Below, in this blog post, I present the text of the second version, which I recorded [minus the Afterwords] for one of Kommissar Hjuler’s audio projects. A few words were changed (“fluxus”, for instance, was inserted in a couple places) and a couple extraneous sections were cut in my attempt to keep the audio under three and a half minutes for Hjuler. In the text version presented here I’ve left my ten phrases of the “Afterwords” intact, though in the HAMSTER IN YOUR SANDWICH performance I invited John to collaborate with additions to each phrase. So, now that I’ve got you thoroughly confused: Deport Dada! I’ll ding 21 of 35 in 20 dance terms as a parting token Support the arts! .. that artificial hell issued President Wash U. S. Fostering cultures and the ache surprise f-fabric, landscapes, erotic symbols Ill eats only started to scatter, breaking where the public review of adverse Prosperity, creativity, and BARACK! BARACK! The arts are fundamental to beauty, ethnicity, religion, or age performance… For Breton it was out of cabaret and the words are of those eaten OMMMMMMMMMS Your tax NOTICE, Dear Ms NOTHING, and he ate canned beans, denied in whole or in part, NO COST TO YOU! Portraits, visiting cards, bit ‘o five franc notes, Defaced… Support the Arts! … that Dada should employ Benefits! You can request message I delivered, that every higher GPA, service-benefit, and music Support the event: Breton had fallen on our prom containing obscene drawings Spectatorship: We hold their attention the date you received creativity and A few months ago the typical items such as meals take place out of cabaret and the Bet was processed in notice of the adverse beatification, Please state whether you request documents or information, That’s the Union Of all ice: we try an erection when the reason you believe a nearby cafe to be Threatening and subversive, FLUXUS is conventions to create a new type of fluxus action and review your animation of our Air, making moments into .1 millions, generating a peanut seller, partly because The hat and or proxy, he us to her in I to ork my condom, and seep the pin hood Education laden Dada group, decanting, then wanting the event into a rut through Improved academic standardized test scores, audience relations improperly denied comments, questioned within 30 days of the NIT … OUT pu-U-zation has an OUT of tourism … Fluxus action would be confronted, imagined better than in a theatre… OW! ILL you is at we OK the at of off, here is NISHED and to end each In a manner you can understand through This, We, A hand of tens Afterwords: Shadow print Misplaced mirage A thinker chair Window movie Baseball hat swan Hand wheelie Deja mirror Skull postcard Billboard itch Wide load towed C. Mehrl Bennett 9/13/14 Hal McGee project cassette cover 001

Listen HERE

Snapshot 1 (8-28-2013 2-44 PM)

Taking turns with one person arranging letters while the other reads them, John M. Bennett and C. Mehrl Bennett create and perform two visual poems. The words and phrases are nonsense and asemic by turns, with occasional recognizable words.

Snapshot of Gaez Snapshot of VEXR