This article by Allan Revich was originally published on the Digital Salon Fluxus Blog at

Please go to the Digital Salon blog to read the full article. Also, remember to click on the “fluxus” tag at Allan’s blog and at THIS blog to read more interesting articles!

Here are a few of my favorite out takes:

……”John Cage was not a Fluxus artist, and he had nothing directly to do with the founding of Fluxus. But he had one really cool idea that made Fluxus (and most art of every kind after his idea) possible. Cage realized that music (he was a composer) was all just sound waves in air.”…….. “A composer, or musician, or artist could organize sound waves in whatever way they wanted, and they could use whatever tools they wanted to, to organize those sound waves. It wasn’t a great leap from there to the idea that visual art was subject to the same thinking.”…….

“In the early 1960s a group of artists, led mostly by George Maciunas and Dick Higgins coalesced around the idea of Intermedia. The idea that art created in the spaces in which different media intersect would be more interesting than art confined to any single medium. George organized the first ever Fluxus Festival in Wiesbaden, Germany in 1962.” …… “The salient point is that, at least until the death of Maciunas in 1978, the IDEA of Fluxus and the PEOPLE of Fluxus were one and the same.
Then things get complicated.”…………

“Dick [Higgins] explicitly rejected a notion that limited Fluxus to a specific group of people who came together at a specific time and place. Dick wrote, “Fluxus is not a moment in history, or an art movement. Fluxus is a way of doing things, a tradition, and a way of life and death.” ” ….. …

……..”Personally, I believe that the work and ideas of the leading Fluxus artists of the 1960s will easily withstand the tests of time. The artists who were footnotes then, will still be footnotes later.” ………….
PS: A HUGE shoutout to Yoko Ono is due here. Not only was she one of the most interesting and influential original Fluxus artists but she continues to support Fluxus Art and artists past, present, and future.”

Revich and Buchholz

Allan Revich and Keith Buchholz

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For the past year I’ve mostly posted small, hand-made accordian books at my Etsy website, and have sold out of all but one of them. Recently, I had an itch to make earrings since I’d been accumulating some interesting beads, including skull beads. The Facebook response to a photo with those skull earrings, including a link to my Etsy site, made me realize there might be a niche market for skull bead jewelry. Who knew? So I’ve posted two more styles of skull earrings (both have options for variations) to my Etsy site. But then again, it might just be a fluke.
Still, just in case someone reading this blog post wants to check out my Etsy site, where I’ve included detailed descriptions of the earring materials, you can go to:

I’m going to post an image of a recent perforated sheet of artistamps I made because it also involves SKULLS. (I’ll even post it for sale at my Etsy site, Elliott Jenkins… HA!) NOTE: The “O cents” refers to “non-sense”…

internet artistamp images Nov 2015 4 001


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The ANTI-BRAIN ROT mailart exhibit was hosted during Roanoke VA’s 2015 AFTER MAF (After Marginal Arts Festival – an AFTER effect from the now defunct annual Marginal Arts Festival)

These are BUT A FEW of the many submissions recieved from all over the world.
Wilhelm Katastrof (alias Tomislav Butkovic) will be mailing documentation out.
Tomislav is pictured behind the glass in this photo of postcards on french door window panes.
Mailart was also hung from clips on strings in one room, and spread out on tables in both rooms.
W Katastrof at home
During the opening last weekend, Reid Wood performed the “Xeno’s Donut” score, Tomislav played an audio CD collaged from various contributors (edited & mailed by Mark Sonnenfeld), and the cat went in and out.
Link to my Etsy site where you can view my accordian book titled: FOURTEEN PICTOGLYPH STORIES, created using a series of artistamps I made from the initial series of pictoglyphs, where some of these images originated.
Full discloser about TV CLUB image: My spouse, John M. Bennett, originated the phrase TV CLUB a few decades ago as a rubber stamp on flourescent orange stickers.

I have uploaded my jpegs at and ordered this set of rubber stamps to use on my mailart! The TV CLUB rubber stamp became a little gift to my husband on our 35th wedding anniversary.


ONE HUNDRED SESSIONS of sitting and smiling for four hours each session were completed by Benjamin K. Bennett on the final day of May 2015! He began documenting these sessions live back on July 28, 2014 — so it’s taken him less than a year to achieve this goal.

Today he’s moving from our home town of Columbus OH to Philadelphia PA and will be spending time on fixing up a row house he bought – putting in a kitchen, etc. He will be closer to a couple of musicians he often has toured with – Jack Wright (saxophone) and Evan Lipson (bass), and he’s also played with Michael Foster, a wonderful performer from NY. Ben is a wonderful improvisational percussionist who often makes his own wind & percussive instruments. He recently replaced a couple drumheads with skin from roadkill animals.

Ben came over for dinner with us a couple days ago and we were visited after dinner by a couple of people who are making short movies about interesting local artists. They wanted to meet us and see where Ben grew up, and they shot some footage during our chat in the livingroom. Most of the footage will end up on the cutting room floor, but we enjoyed their interest in Ben in any case, and I showed off this interesting painting (see below) Ben had done in high school.

I’m hoping Ben won’t mind me posting a few family photos here. We’ll miss having him nearby, but hope to visit him soon!

HERE is a link to Ben’s bandcamp site – so you can listen to samples from various CD’s.


Ben at left. John Also at right.


Ben as a toddler.


Ben’s collage featured on the cover of his father’s book.


The first edition of la M al was published in 2006 by Blue Lion Books, and because it is such a classic stand out, a revised 2nd edition has consequently evolved; published by both Luna Bisonte Prods and by gradient books. 

From the opening poem, “…mumbling in the/attic “roof” out there, mud beyond my head…”, this revised and definitive 2nd edition of John M. Bennett’s classic la M al confirms its position as one of the poet’s best works. Bennett has created a unique language to express the depth and complexity (or the complexity has created the language), of thought and emotion, or emotional thought that are the core of human experience:


a laundry think .but think re diction think a congeries

of faucets faucets like yr “running-sore” a window to a

moon .“a moon all” right a tab le o yr “lips were draped…

The language swarms, swells and ebbs, shatters and recoheres, turns and returns, in patterns that resonate with all the currents, hidden and visible, of the self or selves that inhabit us. An essential book that fully realizes the possibilities of language to contain and know what is.

la M al

Cover by Jukka Pekka Kervinen and C. Mehrl Bennett